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A marketing strategy will help you identify your best customers, understand their needs and implement the most effective marketing methods.

The internet has transformed business marketing. No matter what you do, the internet is likely to be at the heart of your marketing strategy.

Social media is firmly established as a marketing tool. Having a presence opens up new lines of communication with existing and potential customers.

Good advertising puts the right marketing message in front of the right people at the right time, raising awareness of your business.

Customer care is at the heart of all successful companies. It can help you develop customer loyalty and improve relationships with your customers.

Sales bring in the money that enables your business to survive and grow. Your sales strategy will be driven by your sales objectives.

Market research exists to guide your business decisions by giving you insight into your market, competitors, products, marketing and your customers.

Direct marketing can be a highly successful way to generate sales from existing and new customers. Find out how to target them in the best way.

Exhibitions and events are valuable for businesses because they allow face-to-face communication and offer opportunities for networking.

PR

Favourable media coverage can bring a range of business benefits. But how do you attract the attention of editors, broadcasters and journalists?

Tiredness is damaging UK productivity

24 July 2017

Tiredness is damaging UK productivityTwo-thirds of UK workers say tiredness negatively affects their productivity at work, according to new research.

The study of over 1,000 workers by Willis Towers Watson reveals that 66% of workers say they are too tired to work at full capacity, 36% are struggling to get a good night's sleep because of their job and 65% say fatigue has become a bigger workplace problem over the past five years.

Of those who struggle to sleep, more than half cite work stress as the main reason for sleeplessness (55%), followed by job worries (45%), early starts (41%) and late-night working (35%).

Mike Blake, a director at Willis Towers Watson Health & Benefits, said: "The work environment is no longer confined to the office, with the stress of heavy workloads creeping into home life. Whilst companies may benefit from a perceived increase in productivity in the short-term, ongoing stress, coupled with lack of sleep, can risk having an overall negative impact on operational performance."

The research shows that 17% of employers proactively educate their employees on the effect of sleep on general wellbeing. Employee-focused wellbeing programmes allow managers to tackle the causes of low productivity before more serious issues arise, such as absenteeism and presenteeism.

"Employers who become more attuned to the needs of their workers outside the office are more likely to retain a happy and healthy employee base," said Blake. "Companies should aim to identify and tackle potential issues before they become a problem. Open dialogue is key to establishing a positive workplace culture that addresses and mitigates stress and fatigue."

"By placing an emphasis on the importance of sufficient sleep, workers will also feel more comfortable approaching managers about fatigue and solutions can be found, such as meditative practices, review of workloads or flexible working hours."

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